Dec 282008
 

Here is a first look at the Windows 7 beta. All I could really get from the review was that “it’s done”, and that it “feels snappier” and that it is “more responsive”. In the screenshots it still looks like Vista. The taskbar reminds me of KDE. A bunch of torrent sites have the beta up for download. Microsoft is expected to announce the build’s public availability in January. So you can get a copy of it and try it out, but to do so might be “breaking the law”. But that hasn’t deterred a bunch of people who’re out downloading it. Right now, piratebay‘s torrent for the beta is showing 2,503 seeds and 8,137 peers.

On another note though. People seem to think that this is a new operating system from Microsoft. It isn’t. It’s just Vista Service Pack 3, in my opinion. I mean, how long did it take Microsoft to come up with Vista after XP? I seriously doubt they got a brand new operating system out in about a year and a half. The name is just a PR campaign to bury the name “Vista”. There is so much bad press and publicity surrounding the name that Microsoft has to get away from it, if they want the Vista codebase to be successful.

I had Vista on my laptop. It was alright; I didn’t use it long enough to run into too many issues. The UAC prompts were pretty annoying though. Also, compiling anything on it took forever. I’m running Ubuntu on it now, and it’s way faster. My sister and my dad both run Vista, but I haven’t heard of them having any problems. If Windows 7 really is good, then I might actually consider running it. I currently have only one Windows machine and that’s running XP. Everything else is either running FreeBSD or Linux.

Feb 172008
 

I recently bought myself a new laptop – the Dell XPS M1530. I was originally considering a Macbook, but that was a little too pricey for me. I started to fancy OS X ever since I found out that it is basically FreeBSD at the core. Also, there is the eye-candy. Other than the price-tag, I also realized that the only reason I would want the Macbook was because it looks so good. That didn’t seem entirely practical. I could still get the eye-candy and the productivity on another OS. The last laptop I bought was an Alienware beast. It was ridiculously heavy and I got sick of lugging it around. It basically a desktop masquerading as a laptop. In addition to being really heavy, it generates quite a lot of heat. Enough to burn your lap. But it plays games really, really well. Anyway, I decided that I would look for a nice non-Apple laptop. After scouring the Internets and reading a bunch of reviews, I settled on the XPS. It’s sleek, stylish, fast, portable, and it got a bunch of good reviews. I went to the Dell site and configured my XPS:

  • Intel Core 2 Duo Processor T7700 (2.4GHz/800Mhz FSB, 4MB Cache)
  • 3GB Shared Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz (2 Dimms)
  • 256MB NVIDIA GeForce 8600M GT
  • 250GB 5400rpm SATA Hard Drive
  • High Resolution glossy widescreen 15.4 inch LCD(1680×1050) 2MP Camera
  • Slot Load DVD+/-RW (DVD/CD read/write)
  • Integrated Sound Blaster Audigy HD Software Edition
  • Intel Next-Gen Wireless-N Mini-card (4965AGN)

It’s got some punch. I’m mainly going to use it as a development machine so the RAM and speed definitely help as far as compile-times go. They estimated about two weeks to build the laptop, but actually I got a pleasant surprise when the laptop arrived a little over a week after I ordered it. I wasn’t disappointed in the least when I opened up the package. The first thing I did was blast Vista off the hard-drive and install PC-BSD. This is where I learnt a hard lesson. Stability in the BSD world comes at a price. You don’t have very good hardware support (for no fault of FreeBSD; I’ll rant about this later) for the latest hardware. Drivers are not included until they are reliable and stable. As a result, my Marvell Yukon 88E8040 Gigabit Ethernet card, and my Intel 4965AGN Wireless-N card were unrecognized. Marvell (surprisingly) had a FreeBSD 6 driver on their website that is supposed to work with the 88E80XX series, but I was unable to get it to work on my system. I tried using ndiswrapper to get the Intel card working, but I only succeeded in crashing my system very nicely. I was pretty bummed. I really didn’t want to go back to using The Evil (Vista), and so I decided to play around with kubuntu for a while. It was nice, and I may get back to it. But for the hell of it, I wiped it off and tried to install OS X on it. I was able to get a “patched” Leopard ISO and I actually got it to install on the XPS. However, I wasn’t able to get it to recognize any of my network devices. So after playing around with that for a while, I went back to The Evil. I am hoping that by the time PC-BSD 2.0 or FreeBSD 7.0 rolls around, there will be more support for the network cards. If that’s the case, I’ll definitely be wiping out Vista and installing PC-BSD (or install FreeBSD 7.0 and build KDE). I’ve been using Vista for a little while, and I guess it’s not so bad. It’ll stay out of your way if you ask it to. But it really doesn’t compare to either PC-BSD, Kubuntu, or Leopard. As far as the XPS, I like it a whole lot. I think Dell has done a pretty good job with it.

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