Rough Book

random musings of just another computer nerd

Tag: america

Final thoughts

I need to write this down just to sort it out. Everyone says it’s not a “big deal” and that “life will go on”. I don’t know. In elections prior, I have been disappointed but I never grieved. I thought America was headed, or at least heading (however haphazardly) in a direction where we didn’t care about each others’ race, sex, religion, or sexual orientation. I thought that we were poised and ready to tackle the problems of this new century. Then this election happened. Instead of policies, we were literally debating a candidate’s fitness for being President. Instead of merely deciding the direction of this country, we were deciding its character. I never thought that we would elect a man who categorically stated that he wanted to ban an entire religion from this country. I never thought that we would elect a man who is a bully. I thought that we valued experience, knowledge, and intelligence in this country. I never thought we would elect an inexperienced man, who, based on all we know, is not even a successful businessman. I thought we valued pragmatism, poise, and compromise, if not in Congress, at least in the President. I never thought we would elect an immature, thin-skinned man, who goes into an apoplectic fit just from a mean word.

Growing up, we’re taught things by our parents to help us become productive members of society. We are taught to say “Please”, “Sorry”, and “Thank you”. We are taught to respect each other. We are taught not to bully each other. We are taught not to discriminate against each other. We are taught not to take advantage of each other. We are taught not to lie. We are taught to work hard. We are taught to be good people. This election changed all of that. How can a man who disregards the social contract of a society ever be fit to lead that very society? I think those on the other side think I’m sad or disappointed because my party lost. No; it has nothing to do with being Republican or Democrat. But it has everything to do with deciding who we are as a country. Our principles. Our values. Hillary’s sins are well known. She is a flawed candidate. But I don’t think that she is fundamentally a bad person. Think about anyone you disagree with. Simply because you disagree with them, do you consider them a bad person? This is how I have felt about every candidate I didn’t support. I disagreed with Bush, but I never thought he was a bad person. I disagreed with McCain and Romney, but I never thought that they were bad people. They never did anything that ever made me feel that way. Think about Bush’s statement to Cindy Sheehan, his statement about Muslims after 9/11, or McCain’s response to a woman attacking Obama. They were respectful – that is how the people who want to be leaders of this country should behave. How do you explain something like this to a child? If you voted for a person who does everything you tell your child not to do, how do you explain yourself? A Trump supporter told me that one shouldn’t look to politicians for moral guidance. I’m not sure if they understood my original argument. This is not about having a source of morality; it is about an example. Think back to our earliest lessons in morality – fables – if you do bad things, you get in trouble. If you do good things, good things happen to you. Trump contradicts this most basic axiom. His character contradicts it, and now so does our national character apparently, in that a significant part of the country is not just fine with,but wanted a man like this to be president.

As a rebuttal I often get questions as to how I could support someone shady like Hillary. This usually comes with a gish gallop of numerous conspiracy-theory articles. But in general you can sum it up to the following: she lied about Bengazhi, she is corrupt, and of course, her emails. None of those paint her in a flattering light and in isolation they are all concerning. But it turns into a matter of priority. This is what Trump supporters need to understand: she is flawed. But she isn’t talking about banning a whole religion from the country. She could have and probably did make shady deals. But she isn’t talking about how it is ok to sexually assault a woman. She is establishment, and perhaps she cares more for establishment interests. But she isn’t talking about inciting violence or questioning the foundations of our democracy. She may have accepted donations for favors. But she isn’t talking about using nukes or blowing ships out of the water.

I have never felt scared in this country before. That’s different now. Trump’s senior-most advisers are alt-right fanatics. He has regularly courted the white-nationalist and white-supremacist segments of society. He refuses to disavow them as well. I’m not white and I’m an immigrant. How is that supposed to make me feel?

My opposition to Trump is not simply policy. It has nothing to do with the fact that he was on a Republican ticket. It is something far more fundamental; it is about what it means to be an American and a good human-being. It is about how we treat each other. It is about transcending our differences instead of magnifying them. It is about who we are as a society. It is about staying true to the principles that founded this great nation. It is about the statement that we make to the world about who we are as a country. It’s not just about the next 4 years, but the next 400 and where we need to go as a civilization. I really thought we were there. I really thought we were close this time. I really thought that we could start fixing some of the brain-dead decisions that got us here. I really thought that we could actually tackle climate-change. I really thought that we could do it right this time. The irony of all this, is that Trump supporters will never realize is that they not only voted against my interests, but theirs as well. And that is why this hurts so much.

Being a part of history…

Being part of a historically significant event is not something everyone can claim, and this is why I feel so privileged to be part of one today. This was the very first election I voted in since I got my citizenship last year, and I can’t find words to describe my pride in being a part of the greatest democracy on earth, and also being part of a historically significant moment in this nation’s history. 232 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, this nation gets its first African-American President.

I just heard McCain’s speech where he conceded the election to Obama. I’ve always admired Senator McCain; his (pre-campaign) moderate views have always appealed to me. I was quite touched when I heard his speech, especially on his emphasis on how all of us need to rally together as Americans (in spite of repeated booings from the audience, which he asked them to stop) behind President-elect Obama. His core message was that in spite of all our differing views and opinions, the one thing we have in common is that we are all Americans and as such we all have to work together to take this country through the difficult times it is facing.

This campaign has been a long and hard one, but at the end of it all I think we can all say that this election has been a shining example of the best system of governance in the world – democracy. I’m looking forward to the future with a lot of hope. The next four years are going to be full of change. I hope it is a change for the better and I think we can make it so if we all rally behind the President as Americans, because it’s not the President that makes America a great nation. Americans make America a great nation.

Update:
I just heard Obama’s victory speech. I wonder… will children be learning about it in school a hundred years from now? I think they will and they should be, because what I heard was that America has not lost its way. It is still a shining beacon of democracy to the world. This election just proved it.

All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove
%d bloggers like this: